Tag Archives: Youtube


YouTube is a great way to share information with students and colleagues. At the EAP Lab, we have an active YouTube channel which allows us to share various faculty tutorial videos and student lab instructions.

We’ve created for you a brief tutorial video on how to get started with YouTube. It’s FREE and really easy.  We’ll also share with you a more ‘advanced’ tip, which involves making your YouTube videos interactive.

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There are more than 100 hours of video uploaded to Youtube every minute of every day. In fact, if you want to learn something, it is likely you can watch it Video-on-Demand through YouTube. In this discussion we will identify some of the key ways to utilize YouTube in and out of the classroom

Click Here to get to the YouTube Uses Survey and Results

youtubesurvey

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Sometimes I find great videos on YouTube; sometimes my students tell me about great videos on YouTube. Either way I have found that my students like the way I use videos to make writing prompts and discussion boards a little more interesting. In my classes, I like to use short videos paired with readings and other things to stimulate background knowledge and vocabulary acquisition. At NISOD this year a colleague and I presented on some of the tools we use to do this (if you would like to see video of that, click here). Anyways, here is one of the videos I have found that I like to use.

Facts Of Evolution Chapter 1 (Cassiopeia Project) – YouTube.

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Thin-slicing – Recently popularized in Malcolm Gladwell’s book Blink: The Power of Thinking without Thinking (2005), the term “thin-slicing” refers to the ability of individuals to make rapid, yet reliable judgments or decisions based on relatively modest amounts of information. A wonderful teaching example of this comes from the work of Ambady & Rosenthal (1993) On the basis of thirty second observations (three compiled ten second observations from the beginning, middle, and end of a class, 30 seconds total) complete strangers were found to be able to quite accurately predict the ratings of teachers by students who had interacted with them for an entire semester. When parents and students judge us on the first day of class, what impressions do we leave, and can we positively preempt prejudgment?

prE-mailing parents and students is something that can be done to engage them early in the year, even before getting to know them. A preE-mail can be used to…

• Introduce yourself or your team

• Introduce your classroom

• Bridge language gaps (Ask me about Amara.org)

• Build Excitement

• Spark Curiosity

• Gather Information

• The Sky is Really the Limit….

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Sometimes I find great videos on YouTube; sometimes my students tell me about great videos on YouTube. Either way I have found that my students like the way I use videos to make writing prompts and discussion boards a little more interesting. In my classes, I like to use short videos paired with readings and other things to stimulate background knowledge and vocabulary acquisition. At NISOD this year a colleague and I presented on some of the tools we use to do this (if you would like to see video of that, click here). Anyways, here is one of the videos I have found that I like to use.

The Playing For Change Foundation is dedicated to connecting the world through music by providing resources to musicians and their communities around the world. This video can easily be paired with readings on charities, student research on local or other charities, with a local school project, or you name it.

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